Posts Tagged ‘The Car Spy’

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It is hard to believe that the shape of the Continental has been with us for more than 12 years now and with the odd cosmetic tweak and engine upgrade it has managed to establish itself as the best selling Bentley by far. In fact, it is the main reason the company is now considered to be an instantly recognisable global brand which is no mean feat for a single model. Who knows, the Conti might do for Bentley what the 911 has done for Porsche over the decades.

In these times, it is the marketing man who sits at the top table with the company bosses and they look to him to mix his magic potions to eke out every drop of dream-inspiring imagery to help maintain market share of their brand and individual models. The Continental is a good example.

Think of a jolly jaunt down to Monaco in the blink of an eye, wafting along in a near-silent W12 to arrive refreshed at the Casino in time for a game or two of Black Jack.

How about a raucous blast in the Scottish Glens with a glorious V8 under the bonnet while the sports suspension lets you attack corners like Lewis Hamilton?

Fancy a cruise along the Pacific Highway from LA to San Diego? You can just picture yourself in a Continental GTC with the roof down soaking up the sun and the miles listening to Pink Floyd on the Naim audio system.

Get the point? Along with breaking ice speed records it seems there is a Continental for every occasion and for almost every year of production Bentley has tinkered with the ingredients to keep the model fresh in the public’s eye.

So far we have seen…..Mulliner Driving Specs, a Diamond Series, a GTZ, Series 51, Supersports, Speed 80-11 Editions, Design Series China, ISR Edition, GT Speed, GT Le Mans, GT3, GT V8S and GT3-R. Creative or what?

Most Continentals you will find on the road today will be the staple W12 or V8 Coupe but every now and then a ‘special edition’ will appear on our radar and this time it is a 2010 GT Speed W12.

The ‘Speed’ part of the moniker means that (for the 2010 year model) you could expect a not insignificant 602hp instead of the ‘standard’ car’s 552hp whilst sitting on slightly lowered suspension. In other words, it will give you an almighty shove in the back when you want it and is a genuine 200+ mph GT.

Finished in Moonbeam Silver with Beluga hide interior we have been asked to find a buyer for a particularly nice example of a GT Speed which was registered in May 2010 and has completed only 14000 miles since new. A recent service complements the already comprehensive history for the car and the MOT expires in May 2017.

This GT Speed car comes with the following optional extras:-

20″ Speed Dark Tint finish alloy wheels fitted with very good Pirelli PZero tyres, Convenience Specification, Front Massage Seats, Linen Contrast Stitching, Piano Black Trim, Alloy Fuel Filler Cap, CD Changer, Bluetooth, Rear View Camera, TV Tuner, Power Boot Function, Rear View Camera, Space-saving Spare Wheel, Drilled Alloy Sports Pedals, Multi-function Heated Steering Wheel in Single-tone Hide Trim with Brushed Switch Surround, Clear Protection Film to Front and Rear, Mirrors and Side Sills, Bright Chromed Matrix Grille plus Bright Chromed Lower Bumper Matrix Grille, Valet Key.

The following are standard features on the GT Speed:-

Auto-dimming Rear View Mirror, Bi-Xenon Headlamps, Automatic Headlights, Cruise Control, Diamond-quilted Seats, Diamond-quilted Leather Inserts, Electric Steering Column with Easy Exit, Key-less Entry, Heated Electric Seats, Power-fold Heated Mirrors with Memory, Telephone Voice Control, Infotainment System including Satellite Navigation, Multi-zone Climate Control, Rain-sensor Wipers, Tyre Pressure Monitoring, Ultrasonic Park Distance Control Front and Rear.

Phew – not many boxes were left unticked with this car it seems!

This splendid car is on sale at £67,250 so to find out more give The Car Spy a call on 01892 506970 or email sales@thecarspy.net

Please note that part exchanges may be considered.

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BMW Z3M Roadster

1995 was an important year for BMW. It was the year that they launched their first mass-produced sports car and because of a convenient product-placement deal with the production team of Goldeneye they even managed to get James Bond to poodle around in one.

And poodle he did too because the Z3 was underwhelming. The new BMW ‘sports car’ was powered by a very humble 1.8 litre, four cylinder engine that produced a lowly 114 horsepower. You could buy a lawn mower with more pulling power. The car got slated by the press and Joe Public stifled a yawn. BMW die-hards didn’t think it was a BMW and to cap it all the Z3 was made in the US of A and not the Father Land.

The Z3’s design was also a tad contentious at the time. It seemed that the market wasn’t quite ready for such an avant garde styling exercise from conservative BMW but today the quirky shape seems to have been its main virtue and saving grace. It has aged well and might still encourage a second glance in a car park today.

The phallic length of the bonnet and the stubby rear-end was complimented by swoopy wheel arches, side-vents that imitated the gills of a shark and a comfy, tight cockpit that felt a nice place to be. The car still needed a decent engine though and quite frankly it wasn’t until the company installed a straight-six engine in 1999 that the car became an interesting driver’s car with a proper sporty exhaust note too. Especially when BMW decided to lift the 3.2 litre, 320 hp straight-six from the E36 M3 into the sporty-looking Z3 which could now sprint to 60 mph in 5.2 seconds and on to a maximum speed of 155 mph. Enter the Z3M Roadster. That’s more like it.

Apart from the engine transplant a few cosmetic tweaks added a wider rear track, extra vents, exclusive alloy wheels and a delicious quad exhaust system. The interior had a mild-makeover too and bits of chrome were stuck on the dials plus a host of ‘M’ upgrades to differentiate the Z3M from the standard car.

The car was offered in some pretty wild colours too such as Laguna Seca Blue, Phoenix Yellow and our favourite, Estoril Blue.

So where does the car fit in with the ‘Modern Classic’ movement of 2016? Well E36 and E46 M3’s appear to have turned the corner and low-mileage examples are fetching up to £20k in decent condition. The ‘bread-van’ ZM Coupe is heading towards £40k which is remarkable because the odd hunchback-design is not easy on the eye.

The Z3M Roadster has been cheap for far too long but finding a low-mileage example right now is a tough task. These cars are pretty much bullet-proof and therefore owners tended to use them, a lot. The downside of having a great driver’s car is that you want to drive it as much as possible and therefore rack up the miles.

A budget of £10k was entirely feasible a couple of years ago but these days a low-mileage car will be just south of £20k. The Z3M Roadster has come of age and is now recognised as a truly great sports car from BMW. Its collectable status in the future is guaranteed and prices will only go one way from now on.

So how about a 1999 example with only 62,000 miles on the clock finished in Estoril Blue with two-tone blue leather interior? We have been asked to find a new owner for a particularly well cared-for example with excellent service history (BMW and specialist) and unusually the car has had only four owners from new.

This ‘T’ plate Z3M has all-electric heated seats, electric mirrors, power hood, 5-speed manual gearbox and a Kenwood single CD system.

The car has received a major service in October 2015, an air conditioning re-gas, all four original alloy wheels have been refurbished and the MOT expires in October 2016.

For further details or to arrange a viewing of this original Z3M Roadster give The Car Spy a call on 01892 506970 or email sales@thecarspy.net

Sorry this car is now SOLD!

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January 2016. A memorable month perhaps for not many good reasons. David Bowie, Alan Rickman, Lemmy and even Terry Wogan all gone from our world in a couple of weeks. Gone but of course never forgotten since each has left a legacy that will remain with their respective fans forever, including yours truly.

In the world of cars another British icon said farewell this month too. The Land Rover Defender is no more. Exactly 2,016,933 have been produced since 1948 and the car is probably one of the most recognised vehicles anywhere in the world and quite likely one of the most loved too.

Famous owners have included the Queen (of course), Winston Churchill, Steve McQueen, James Bond, Richard ‘The Hamster’ Hammond and The Car Spy (haha). There are many more ‘famous’ owners, of course, worth mentioning but that’s enough name-dropping for now.

Because you like music does not mean you would be be obliged to appreciate the many albums of David Bowie and because you like cars you might not appreciate a Land Rover (Series I, II, III, 90, 110 , Defender etc) and that is ok.

Notwithstanding individual opinion in cars and musical taste both the names of ‘Bowie’ and ‘Land Rover’ have been engraved into the stone tablet milestones of British history. You just know that in 100 years from now they will be a part of our ‘historical culture’. Just like Shakespeare.

Today this blog article was to be about a highly collectable Italian exotic that is the subject for a photo-shoot next week but instead it has turned out to be a eulogy for the Defender. But ‘eulogy’ means praising somebody or something that has just died so it’s really more of a ‘lifetime achievement award’ speech.

To appreciate a Defender (we’ll just stick to that moniker for simplicity’s sake) you have to consider a car that did not pretend to do anything else that what it was originally designed for. It was meant to be basic but very fit for for purpose.

Stick it on the edge of a muddy field on the side of a steep hill and tell it get to the top of the hill. Whichever variant you picked it would get the job done. No computer-assisted driving aids but pure mechanical engineering genius to carry out the task in hand. That is why farmers the world over relied on them. You could do the same thing thing in a tractor but you couldn’t park it in Waitrose for the weekly shop on the way home. Well you could but you just wouldn’t.

A Defender didn’t need aerodynamics, satnav, electric windows, aircon or airbags. It was the antithesis of today’s ‘modern car’. Our workshop mechanic said you only needed a Philips screwdriver and a pair of pliers in your toolbox to look after one. A slightly optimistic view but nonetheless not that far from the truth.

And therein really lies the problem with the Defender and why it had to be terminated- it does not make any commercial sense for a car manufacturer in 2016.

Cars have to be complex these days. Profits are made not from just building the thing in the first place but from the spare parts and workshop bills accumulated thereafter. We live in a world of consumerism and therefore everything has to be disposable. We have suddenly got used to upgrading to a new iPhone very year even though deep down we know don’t really need too.

But hey ho this is how the world turns now.

However, just like the music of David Bowie the Defender hasn’t died at all. You can buy a 70’s variant and have access to the same after-market support offered to the latest (and last) model. You can do almost anything yourself to keep the car on the road. It is the last of the Meccano-cars and if you have even the basic of interests in car mechanics and engineering then buy yourself a Defender. It is a deeply satisfying experience and it should be a mandatory part of any engineering course at university.

So why all of the fretting of the so-called replacement for the Defender?

One of the reasons that Land Rover have not rushed in with a new ‘evolutionary replacement’ is that they don’t know what to replace the Defender with. They haven’t got a clue. Defender purists want a car they can strip down and rebuild themselves but the market wants designer handbags or at the very least a ‘lifestyle’ accessory. Good luck with that one JLR!

On the other hand if you are not a fashion victim and fancy getting your fingernails dirty over the weekend then you have a big pond to fish in and for some time yet. Over 2 million ‘Land Rovers’ have been made and most are likely to be on the road still so get stuck into the classifieds!

Until the EU bureaucrats and Whitehall mandarins ban these types of cars forever then there is still life in the Defender yet.

Dead maybe but not gone for a while yet. Long live H166 HUE!

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A very big THANK YOU to everybody who voted for us in the 2016 UK Blog Awards since we have now been told that we are one of the finalists in the Automotive category. The awards ceremony will be taking place on the 29th April at the Park Plaza Hotel in London – wish us luck!

f12brosso

Looks aren’t everything so my mother used to tell me. It’s the person inside she said and how right she was too. In the car world however, looks are very important. Subjective maybe, but still important.

The Porsche Panamera springs to mind. I remember walking up to the car for the first test drive and decided that I was going to hate it. The bulbous rear hind-quarters following the flat-nosed front end made it look as though they had stretched a 911 too far on a rack and stuck two doors on each side. The Panamera was not pretty.

But to drive the car was sublime. Great driving position, performance and handling made it very easy to forget the awkward shape of the car being driven. Until you caught a reflection of the Panamera in a large shop window and realised what the rest of the world could see as you bowled merrily along the high street.

Handing the keys back was filled with mixed emotions. What a great car to drive but so hard to fall in love with. I tried hard to forgive the peculiar design but to this day, nine years later, the Panamera has not aged well. Sorry Porsche. Hopefully your forthcoming face-lift for the car this year will transform this ugly duckling.

History is littered with examples of cars that have struggled in the style stakes but have nonetheless been recognised as proper driving machines. One that came up in conversation recently was the BMW Z3M Coupe. Unkindly described by some people as a ‘bread van’, BMW had somehow managed to transform the interesting design of the Z3 roadster into a disfigured hunchback of a coupe. But we loved it and so it seems does everybody else these days with decent examples fetching up to £40k. Who would have guessed that?

Even Ferrari has made a couple of faux-pas in the shape of the Mondial, designed by Pininfarina, and its predecessor the 308/208 GT4 designed by Bertone. Time hasn’t been kind to the Mondial and possibly the Bertone offspring wins by a whisker in this comparison. What about the Testarossa that still looks like it is stuck in the 80’s with those exaggerated side-intakes and the 456 which was probably the most bland design ever to come from Maranello?

But all it takes is the arrival of a superstar in the company’s line-up and all those previous mishaps are forgotten. Enter the F12berlinetta in 2012.

With a mix of dramatic curves and the odd aggressive sharp crease in the right place Ferrari created a car you could stare at all day. You could buy it and never drive it because you wanted to make sure you had taken in every inch of the beautiful shape and then go back and check it all over again.

But drive it you must. Before the LaFerrari arrived it was the fastest production car out of Maranello. The figures speak for themselves: 6.2 litre V12 producing 740hp. 0-60 mph in less than 3 seconds. 0-120 mph in 8.5 seconds. Maximum speed 211 mph. The F12 is a seriously fast car and only the F12tdf will come between this and the LaFerrari when it is launched this year.

However, it is not just about the looks and the performance figures but it is also the aural sensation of the way it goes about its business. The engine note is akin to that heard in a Formula One race car. A kind of mid-range bark that turns into a screaming wail at high revs and then crackles loudly on the fast down-shifts. Delicious.

So there it is. Is the F12berlinetta the perfectly packaged sports car with the looks, the performance and the noise to go with it? We think it comes close and has certainly set a very high bar for all newcomers. Maybe only Ferrari itself can eclipse its own accomplishments but we shall find out in the fullness of time no doubt.

For anybody now thinking of purchasing an F12berlinetta we can tell you about a car that will be coming onto the market in a couple of weeks from now – let’s say early February.

Finished in Rosso Corsa with Cuoio Leather interior, this F12 is right hand drive, brand new and unregistered. The specification includes the following: yellow brake calipers and rev counter, Scuderia shields, fully electrically operated seats, reverse camera, suspension lifting system, AFS, carbon/LED steering wheel plus 20″ forged and painted wheels. This is also a vat qualifying vehicle.

For further details including pricing information please contact The Car Spy on ++44 (0)1892 506970 or ++44 (0)7809 890969. You can also send an email to sales@thecarspy.net

In the meantime this video from Chris Harris about the Ferrari F12berlinetta gives a good insight to the car and its ultimate capabilities. It is nearly 15 minutes long but great viewing….enjoy!

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lamboc1

There are too many icons from the 1970’s but some will remain in our minds forever. Glam-rock, flares, tank-tops and the Lamborghini Countach are freeze-framed for eternity.

Any self-respecting petrol-head with a spare bedroom wall to hang the Athena posters on would have given centre-stage to the one featuring the Countach. The car was white and it was car-porn. Yours truly remembers it well.

Even better than having the poster was to one day see a Countach in the flesh and one day it happened, in Carnaby Street (or very near that at least). The car was red and matched the owner’s jacket. It attracted a large crowd and the sound ‘Wow’ was repeated constantly which roughly translated is what ‘Countach’ meant if you came from the Piedmont region in Italy. A visitor from Mars may just have well landed in front of us.

Today, the car is still likely to get the same reaction. Not because of its outrageous design but more so that it comes from the past. From around 40-odd years ago in fact. That is what boggles the mind these days. Park one next to a Pagani Huayra and see which car attracts the most attention. Have another look at the sharp, angular detailing of the design and then take a close look at the Aventador. The genes are obvious and the Countach set the blue-print for most Lamborghinis that followed it.

In its day the Countach was no slouch but by today’s hypercar standards a 0-60 mph time of slightly less than 6 seconds and a top speed of 160 mph seems a bit laid-back and more comparable to modern-day hot hatch performance figures. However, if road presence is a major factor then a Countach has it by the spade-full and not only did the car look sensational it sounded mental too.

A few decades ago nobody really gave a damn about how noisy your car was. Cherry-bomb exhausts and sawn-off silencers were high priorities for a spotty-faced adolescent looking to impress his mates in the pub car park. The louder the better so it went back then.

A Countach’s V12 woke up with a war-zone explosive sound that could vibrate the inside of your rib-cage. It was feral and primeval and made your neck-hairs stand upright. It was glorious and it attacked all of the senses. This is what made the Countach a hero of its day.

Today, the Jimi Hendrix of the car world is more likely to be found posing at a classic car event or sitting in an auction room as eye-candy for investment opportunists. It is likely that most owners of the few that were made have ever driven them, at least if they have then not very far. And who would want to anyway? On the UK’s congested roads and tight parking spaces the Countach would be a pig to navigate. The letter-box view from the cockpit and virtually no rearward vision would make for a very stressful driving experience let alone the recurring nightmare of damaging your very expensive purchase.

So how much would you have to pay for one today? Up until only a few years ago it was possible to buy one for well under £100k. Today you would need to spend at least double that for a decent example. It is strange that such an important car as the Countach would have arrived so late to the ‘appreciating classics’ scene but now it seems the sky is the limit depending on which model is up for sale. An early 70’s car with solid-gold provenance could probably write its own cheque.

Not many do come on the market but on the 26th – 28th February Silverstone Auctions will be featuring a rare right hand drive 1981 LP400S which was originally purchased by a certain Tim Dutton Woolley of Dutton Cars fame. The car appears to have a decent recorded history with plenty of paperwork to support the work carried out on the car over the years including various colour changes. The current-day Pearl Yellow finish suits this Countach and is a good match for the Oatmeal leather interior. Just look at those dinky 15″ Campagnolo wheels too!

Yep, still in love with the Countach so it seems that The Car Spy is about to make another poster purchase.

For more details of this Countach click here take a look at the information on the Silverstone Auction site

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car_photo_343408If you were building a super-fast sports car what name would you give your newest creation? It must be one of the biggest challenges facing a car-producer.

Get it wrong and your new baby will be an also-ran, side-lined in favour of those with far more glamorous and therefore appealing monikers.

Lamborghini has the magic touch. Think of Countach, Diablo, Aventador, Sesto Elemento. It doesn’t matter what they mean they just sound epic.

But how many manufacturers come up with a name that perfectly describes the car itself? The ‘Mini’ was a no-brainer and is probably the best automotive example of ‘it does what it says on the tin’.

How about ‘Rocket’ then? You would need rather large testicles to stick that label on anything other than something that actually resembles a rocket and indeed goes like one. Enter the Light Car Company.

Formed by racing driver Chris Craft and a certain Gordon Murray of McLaren F1 fame and a lot of other stuff too, the Light Car Company presented the Rocket to the world in 1991.

So what makes a Rocket a rocket?

Well, the tiny Yamaha straight-four bike engine could scream its head off right up to 10,500 rpm in order to propel the missile-shaped object to 60 mph in around 4 seconds and onwards to 140 mph. So what? you say – by today’s standards that is pretty good but not earth-moving. But that was back in 1991, nearly a quarter of a century ago.

Gordon Murray set out to design the automotive equivalent of the most efficient interpretation of form and function for the road. It would be the closest thing anybody could get to driving a Formula One car without the necessary backing of Agip or Marlboro.

Only 47 of these extraordinary cars have been built to-date and the Rocket must surely go down in the history books as the car that presented a living demonstration of brilliant driving dynamics and the physics behind it all. In other words, if you want to have a go at making the perfect car use a Rocket as your template.

So rare are these cars it is not very often that one will come up for sale. However, we are fortunate enough to be given the opportunity to find a new owner for build number 18 of the 47 that comes with a rather interesting history.

We’ll let the current owner, Charles Craft, take over at this point……

“I briefly worked for my uncle, Chris Craft, and the Light Car Company in 1991 prior to the launch of the original car and even then, aged 19, I knew I had to have one.

In 2006 I was lucky enough to purchase RO18 from Chris, but as it turned out I’ve actually known the car far longer. The first time I dove it was in 1995. Back then it was the first race spec car built and I drove it at a Rocket Reunion in Surrey.

Soon after it was sold to Valentine Lindsay, repainted blue and white and road registered. The car also featured in the Rocket Euro Series brochure and was the launch car for the still-born race series. Chris purchased the car back again in 2006.

Chassis RO18 has a unique dash which Gordon designed for the race cars, it also has added roll over protection to the front of the car over the standard road going Rockets, and the body also features a small recess on the nearside for the battery isolator switch and fire extinguisher pull, which I think again are unique.

The engine in RO18 has an increased capacity 1049cc engine, with uprated internals featuring Carrillo rods and a 6 speed closer ratio gearbox fitted in 2014. This is a rare but worthwhile upgrade over the standard 5 speed unit. The bespoke chain-driven rear transaxle incorporates both high, low ratio, reverse and a limited slip differential – low ratio is used most of its time, high ratio used more when cruising.

Like so many things with this game-changing little car the engine is another marvel, previously the preserve of only racing cars and superbike riders. The Yamaha 1049cc 4 cylinder redlines at 12,000 and produces approx. 145bhp, propelling 380 kilos means approximately 400 hp per tonne. The engine will happily potter around at low revs but with good mid-range power making rapid progress from 5-7,000 but after then it really comes alive and to my mind gives this little car so much of its character. To say it’s manic is a bit of understatement, the noise is epic. As with a motorbike, the sequential gearbox is fast and each cog really only drops about 1,500 revs straight back into the power band and this is when the car really flies. There is little torque but because it’s so light it doesn’t need it.

Brembo brakes are from an early 90’s F3 car and ensure that this car will still out brake just about anything on the road and are completely free from fade. Bilstein dampers and new bushes back in 2008 ensure handling is as expected from one of the greatest chassis designers ever, and Avon CR28 tarmac spec rally tyres have proven to be the best tyre suited to the car. Grip is huge and more than you could really ever want for the road. The ride is comfortable but firm, never jarring as the lack of anti-roll bars really allows the suspension to do its job. Steering is quick and direct, which is what you want when pushing on, it will wander a little at higher speeds if you let it, but a firm hand keeps it in check. You can even take a passenger in tandem if they are up for the ride! Point to point, on smaller twisty roads Jay Leno has been quoted as saying he thinks his Rocket is quicker than his F1.

Apart from the all-consuming driving experience, one of the greatest things about the Rocket is the effect it has on other road users and passers-by, it really makes people smile. Lots of people ask if it’s road legal and it doesn’t invite the envious looks some ‘in your face’ supercars can create. I think it’s because you are effectively driving a road-biased racing car and that’s part of the thrill of driving it, as it almost feels like you shouldn’t be doing it. Gordon Murray lets young designers drive his Rocket to really understand the benefit of minimal mass in a vehicle.

Without wishing to sound smug, owning and driving this car is a little bit like knowing a secret that you want to share with other car enthusiasts, the purity and integrity of its design is unlikely to be repeated, its minimalism and perfect form almost impossible to replicate with current day legislation. Sure not everyone will get it, but that almost adds to its appeal. The fact that a number of McLaren F1 owners also have a Rocket is all you need to know. A landmark car ahead of its time if ever there was.”

The following is a summary timeline of car No. 18:-

  • Built by the Light Car Company in 1994 painted yellow with yellow chassis, the first race spec car.
  • Chassis number 18 out of a run of 47 cars.
  • Original matching numbers for engine and chassis.
  • Car featured in Rocket Euro Series brochure.
  • Converted to road legal in 1995 painted blue with white chassis.
  • Chris Craft buys car back in early 2006.
  • Bought by Charles Craft from Chris Craft after an overhaul and refresh of all mechanicals by Luke Craft and body work by Andrew Craft!
  • 2008 new steering rack, suspension incl. bushes, transaxle repair/rebuild, larger capacity radiator and fan to aid cooling.
  • 2010 Engine rebuild including 5 speed gearbox, new hoses, sprocket and chain.
  • 2014 Engine refresh including 6 speed gearbox fitted and carbs cleaned and rebuilt.
  • Road trips to Le Mans, Nurburgring and Spa from 2008 to present day, the car has done 3 track days in 9 years.
  • Used regularly and serviced, including oil change, plugs other consumables and by Charles Craft with assistance from Chris and Luke.

Above all, this is a well-known car which has been maintained and cared for car and of course, very much enjoyed.

Maybe the best way to summarise this car is the following quote from Car Magazine in May 1992 – “Unless you’ve driven a single-seater racing car, and a fast one at that, nothing can prepare you for the thrill of driving a Rocket.”

Oh yes, there is also a book coming out soon about LCC Rocket called ‘Two Men’s Singular Vision’. RO18 will have copy number 18 signed by both Chris Craft and Gordon Murray to go with the car and new owner.

For further details about this remarkable car with amazing provenance give The Car Spy a call on 01892 506970 or email sales@thecarspy.net.

This car is now SOLD!

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