This very rare, genuine, right hand drive MB 220SE convertible was registered in the UK on the 29th September 1965 is being offered for sale on behalf of the current owner who lives in Thailand.

Finished in very attractive metallic silver/blue paintwork with contrasting dark blue leather interior the car presents itself very well and wears an appealing patina of age combined with some tastefully restored and updated fittings. The car was originally a maroon colour but is recorded as being re-painted in 2000.

The chrome finishings are free of any serious corrosion with just minor localised pitting in some areas.

The blue leather interior and black hood appear to have been re-commissioned at some stage in the car’s life but since there is no service history available with the car it is difficult to determine exactly when the work might have been done. However, the condition of those items is very good including the blue tonneau cover for the hood when folded.

The odometer is currently showing 45948 miles and the mot history indicates that in 2007 the car had done 41258 miles, suggesting that only very light use has been made of the car during the past 12 years of its life. The next MOT is not due until July 2020.

The engine starts without fuss and idles very smoothly whilst the suspension shows no signs of sagging or lack of support on all four corners.

Although this 220SE does not present itself in concours condition it is both a perfectly usable, solid classic and an ideal base for a long-term project to turn it into a show-winning example.

Genuine 220SE convertibles are very hard to come by since there are many coupes that have been modified to soft-top versions. In addition this an original UK-registered, right hand drive model which adds even more rarity value to the car.

THIS CAR IS NOW SOLD!

mercedes benz sls amg 6.3

Finished in Designo Mystic White with Black Leather interior we have been asked by the current (overseas) owner to find a buyer for this extremely low-mileage, right hand drive 2011 Mercedes Benz SLS 6.3 AMG which has completed only 8500 miles since new. The excellent condition of the car is a given considering the very low miles recorded to date.

This SLS AMG Coupe comes with the following comprehensive specification:-

Designo Mystic White, Black Nappa Leather, Contrast White Stitching, COMAND Nav – UK/Europe, Rear View Camera, Daytime Driving lights, Auto Dimming Interior and Exterior Mirrors, Memory Package (Driver Seat, Mirrors, Steering Column), AMG Performance Steering Wheel Alcantara, Tyre Pressure Monitor, Folding mirrors, DVD Changer, Universal Communications Interface (UCI), Auto Climate Control, Headlamp Wash, Roof Interior Black Alcantara, AMG Double Spoke Alloys Polished – 19/20″, Carbon High Gloss Interior trim.

Service History:

Mercedes Benz South Africa (Culemborg) supplied from new.
Registered in the UK 20/1/2016 – 2 owners since then.
8500 MILES ONLY
Nav Update by MB Winchester March 2016
Serviced by MB Winchester September 2016 at 8000 Miles
MB South Africa have confirmed the following Main Dealer Services:
14/07/15- 11611 KMS (7214 Miles) MB Dealer Number: 138
15/07/14- 8292 KMS (5152 Miles) – MB Dealer Number: 00400
02/07/13- 4983 KMS (3096 Miles) – MB Dealer Number: 0400
Last MOT’d 25th May 2017 at 8184 miles. A fresh MOT and a ‘B’ service are now due on the car which will be carried out at the point of sale.
Kept in secure storage since late 2017. Comes with two keys.

This car is now SOLD!

For further details or to arrange a viewing in West Sussex of this SLS please call The Car Spy on 01892 506970 or email sales@thecarspy.net

Old-School Cool: 1999 Volvo V70R AWD

Posted: January 19, 2020 by The Car Spy in Classic Cars, For Sale, Volvo
Tags: , , ,

The Car Spy does like a Q-car or a so-called ‘sleeper’. Something that looks like it couldn’t peel the skin off a rice pudding but has a discreet morsel of pumped muscle hiding under those family-friendly looks. Enter the Volvo V70R from the 90’s.

Much-loved by antique dealers for its ability to carry the entire contents of a stately-home, the ‘First Generation’ V70 had a somewhat conservative image. However, when Volvo stuck the turbo-charged 2.3 litre engine and an ‘R’ badge on the tailgate the Old Bill and British Touring Car drivers just couldn’t get enough of them. This was a high-performance family estate sporting an old man’s cloth cap. Sleepers didn’t come much better than this.

Phrases like ‘modern classics’ and ‘collectable cars’ are not normally associated with the Volvo brand, although, to be fair, original Amazons and P1800’s have their place in automotive history but the V70R from the 90’s onwards deserves to be taken seriously.

The good news is that if you are in the market for one you don’t need particularly deep pockets. There are normally several on offer in the classifieds for no more than £10k which is less than the annual depreciation on a brand new car from Geely-owned Volvo today.

Cars like the V70R are cool because only real car enthusiasts will appreciate and respect the historical capabilities of a car like this. Even car-mad JK (Jamiroquai) has had one in his impressive collection of desirable cars. And today, 250 BHP, 150 mph and a 0-60 time of just over 7 seconds is not too shabby for a car designed and built when Wham! were at No.1 in the charts.

We found this Laser Blue Metallic example on sale with only 95k miles on the clock at what appears to be a very reasonable £7990. Likely depreciation? Zero and if anything, likely to appreciate, we would bet on it.

Full details on the advertising dealer’s website are as follows: https://www.quickandbig.com/volvo-v70r-awd-1999

So values of classic Fords are on the rise at auctions and deservedly so, we think. Any petrolhead who can remember the car heroes of the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s will know that Ford was the trail-blazer that turned mundane mainstream family cars into the sporting legends we all dreamt of owning one day. Lotus Cortina’s, RS Capri’s, Escort Mexico’s and Sierra Cosworth’s stole the automotive limelight and there didn’t seem to be a single TV cop series without a Ford as the motor of choice for the lead character(s). Cue instant flashback to ‘The Professionals’ and ‘The Sweeney’.

Like most ‘modern classics’, those more desirable examples of the brand have long since departed this world via the scrap-metal crusher or are currently locked away in a secure, climate-controlled storage facility like some precious work of art never to be seen and enjoyed by anyone apart from its owner.

Fortunately, however, the odd, very nice original example of one of those desirable Fords with Nike trainers will make an appearance in the classified ads and this non-modified 1990 Ford Escort Turbo RS Series II definitely caught our eye.

The dealer marketing the car is stating that the very low 44,000 mileage is genuine (backed up by MOT history) and there appears to be service history covering the early years of the car’s life. This Diamond White RS is being advertised at £18,995 which seems very competitive if the car and its mileage are as genuine as claimed. A 1989 Northern Ireland-supplied example with 29,000 miles sold for £27,900 last November at Silverstone Auctions – https://bit.ly/2G3TL9O

The Series II RS Turbo had the revised and uprated 1.6 litre CVH engine which produced 132 BHP, giving the car a top speed back in the day of 125 mph and a 0-60 mph time of 8.3 seconds. Those figures might seem pretty average by today’s standards but thirty years ago they were pretty much class-leading.

It appears that classic sporting-Fords will never be ‘cheap’ again especially since their heritage and impact on their modern equivalents is now being truly appreciated.

Take a look at the car in detail here:- https://bit.ly/2RxGU4W

Some people of a certain age remember steam engines. Living proof of an industrial revolution that helped change the world whilst making the most modest of train journeys a noisy, dirty but somehow enthralling, emotive experience. The job of a train driver was high on the wish-list of most adolescent young men smitten by the glamour of those powerful steam engines.

And then came the electric train. Clean, fast, efficient but with all due respect to train operators today, young boys stopped wanting to drive them.

The death of the steam-age and the arrival of electrification occurred a number of decades ago and yet the internal combustion engine, in some ways as primitive as the steam engine, has survived. Perhaps it is that childhood passion to control something mechanically powerful that even as adults we (as petrol-heads anyway) have an addiction that is hard to overcome.

And so times, however and inevitably, are changing (or rather evolving) again. Autonomous, electric cars are the future we are told and like it or not, just like the fans of those prodigious steam locomotives the baton will be reluctantly passed on to a new generation.

But, for the time-being at least, that looks like a dream for the future which means that today we can still experience the sheer joy of driving a car that was designed for pleasure and not just for purpose.

Despite being powered by relatively old technology, the new cars of today are frustrated by modern technology which means that they do a specific job for which they were built in the safest, most efficient manner that the (constantly evolving) law demands. Driver aids are de rigueur.

However, a car built in the analogue age will offer just about the purest mechanical connection to the dynamics of driving a car with four wheels and British sports cars of the 1950’s and 60’s provided the perfect ingredients for an evocative drive.

Enter the ‘Big Healey’ that we have on sale here.

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